Bears went into hibernation early

Brendan Reidy, Courier Staff

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The Chicago Bears’ season should be cancelled. They are the most disappointing team in the National Football League.

Coming into the year, the Bears were considered Super Bowl contenders after going 12-4 and making the playoffs behind an elite defense and an up and coming quarterback Mitchell Trubisky.

However, things went completely off the rails in the NFL’s 100th season, and no one knows what happened to this once daunted team. The Bears currently sit at 4-6 and are in third place of the NFC North. However, their playoff hopes are slim if any at that matter after losing in a very important Sunday Night Football matchup against the Rams.

There is a big disconnect somewhere with this team, and the three people to blame are general manager Ryan Pace, head coach Matt Nagy and supposed to be “franchise quarterback” Trubisky.

Let’s start with Ryan Pace. He has been with the Bears’ organization for six years and has completely reshaped the team in his image. Up to this point, he has been fairly successful, but has made some questionable moves that are fire able offenses. One of the great things Pace does are finding talent in the later rounds of the draft and spending wisely in free agency. He has found players such as All-Pros Eddie Jackson and Tarik Cohen in the middle rounds of the draft, and has also found stud players like Allen Robinson and Akiem Hicks on bargain deals. Although these are some good traits a general manager should possess, he has struggled greatly with high draft picks and personnel decisions. He has had plenty of top 10 picks in his time as GM, and has whiffed on players like Kevin White, Leonard Floyd and even taking Trubisky over two MVP candidates. When it comes to personnel, he thinks too much. This man has chosen two head coaches. His first being John Fox, and experienced NFL coach who did not pan out for the team, but got another chance and chose Nagy who at first seemed like a home run pick.

Nagy has been the complete opposite of who he was a season ago. A supposed to be “offensive genius” who was tasked with turning the team around and developing Trubisky. In his first season, things were magical. The offense was transformed and Trubisky was a Pro Bowl alternate, but most of all, football was back to being fun again in Chicago. Hopes for high for Nagy’s second year, but things got off to a rocky start in Primetime against the Green Bay Packers to whom they lost 10-3 in their season opener. From that point on, things began to spiral out of control with plenty of questionable play calls resulting in the Bears losing in close games. The offense ranks almost last in every statistical category, and more importantly the Bears do not have an identity. Obviously not all the blame falls on the former NFL Coach of the Year, but there has to be a point where you admit you were wrong at points during the game, and that is something Nagy has refused to do.

The third member of the Chicago Bears trifecta is no other than quarterback Trubisky. Coming off a solid season, everyone was expecting a big jump because it would be the second year in Nagy’s system. However, that was not the case. It took Trubisky to his third game to get his first touchdown pass, and that was against the dreadful Washington Redskins. He has been on and off with injury, but that is no excuse for being very inconsistent on passing attempts that seem to be either too high or too far ahead of his receivers. It seems like just yesterday everyone in Chicago was wrapped around Trubisky’s finger, and now it seems like the majority want him out of town.

There’s still six games left in the season, but it does not look ideal for Chicago fans. And if they keep playing the way they are, do not be surprised if one or maybe all three of these people are no longer with the organization. As an optimistic Bears fan, it’s tough to see how much things have changed since the infamous “double-doink,” here’s to hoping they can get it figured out these next six weeks, and build that momentum into next season. Bear Down.

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