Western Courier

Peace talks in Korea are a good sign

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Peace talking in Korea.

Peace talking in Korea.

SCNP.COM

SCNP.COM

Peace talking in Korea.

Jason Adams, Courier Staff

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In a surprising move last week, North Korean Leader Kim Jong-Un crossed the border into South Korea for a meeting between the leaders.

In an incredibly rare move by Jong-Un, he proposed officially ending the Korean War and shutting down their nuclear test site according to the New York Times. He was the first North Korean leader to go to the southern end of the peninsula in the country’s history. Jong-Un seemed to completely flip his views during these talks, saying that North Korea did not not have a need for nuclear weapons and would be willing to make a deal with South Korea and the U.S. to destroy the existing sites as long as the U.S. promises not to invade the country. The U.S. has made it clear in recent months that while not the first option, they would not be afraid to use military force against North Korea if it came to it. That could potentially be what led the North Koreans to finally give up and give in to the U.S.’s demands. North Korea also had increased sanctions placed on them that may have also been the final push.

While North Korea has made promises like this before in the past and has gone right back to testing nuclear weapons, this time feels different. The North Koreans asking to formally end the Korean War is a new aspect in these negotiations as they went from ready to end the cease-fire to ready to end the war. North Korea also seemed willing to allow the U.S. and South Korea to help facilitate the removal of the nuclear test site which could be a promising sign. There is a chance they have other nuclear test sites we’re not aware of though. Still, the end of a war that my grandpa served in seems promising.

The real question though and why there is so much speculation about these talks is that this came out of nowhere. The sanctions and military threats were nothing new to North Korea and they seemed unphased throughout. Missile tests went on even after those events first started happening. So what changed? It could be a lack of resources, sanctions may have started affecting the country more than they expected. With no real strong allies, North Korea has to get most of their resources internally. Missiles and nuclear weapons also require a lot of energy and resources to produce, forcing North Korea to either perfect their weapons or give up. It looks like North Korea chose the later. While there is a lot of this situation that needs to play out. Whether threat of force or lack of resources, it looks like the Korean peninsula could become more stable very soon.

Hopefully this time North Korea will be genuine and actually make the effort to improve relations and not put us on the brink of World War III. It’s a step in the right direction, but hopefully the step is in good faith.

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Peace talks in Korea are a good sign