Mueller elected to Speaker of the Senate

Andrew+Mueller+is+elected+to+the+position+of+Speaker+of+the+Senate+for+Student+Government+Association+%28SGA%29+for+the+2016-17+school+year+over+opponent+John+Kennealy.+Inter-Hall%0ACouncil+%28IHC%29+senator+Maddie+Heinzer+presents+her+bill+to+the+floor+that+asks+to+extend+the+GoWest+Route+6+Maroon+line+to+30+minutes+after+Malpass+Library+closes.
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Mueller elected to Speaker of the Senate

Andrew Mueller is elected to the position of Speaker of the Senate for Student Government Association (SGA) for the 2016-17 school year over opponent John Kennealy. Inter-Hall
Council (IHC) senator Maddie Heinzer presents her bill to the floor that asks to extend the GoWest Route 6 Maroon line to 30 minutes after Malpass Library closes.

Andrew Mueller is elected to the position of Speaker of the Senate for Student Government Association (SGA) for the 2016-17 school year over opponent John Kennealy. Inter-Hall Council (IHC) senator Maddie Heinzer presents her bill to the floor that asks to extend the GoWest Route 6 Maroon line to 30 minutes after Malpass Library closes.

Andrew Mueller is elected to the position of Speaker of the Senate for Student Government Association (SGA) for the 2016-17 school year over opponent John Kennealy. Inter-Hall Council (IHC) senator Maddie Heinzer presents her bill to the floor that asks to extend the GoWest Route 6 Maroon line to 30 minutes after Malpass Library closes.

Andrew Mueller is elected to the position of Speaker of the Senate for Student Government Association (SGA) for the 2016-17 school year over opponent John Kennealy. Inter-Hall Council (IHC) senator Maddie Heinzer presents her bill to the floor that asks to extend the GoWest Route 6 Maroon line to 30 minutes after Malpass Library closes.

Kayla Trail

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Andrew Mueller was elected as next semester’s Speaker of the Senate at last night’s Student Government Association (SGA) meeting.

Mueller, a mathematics major, was up for the position against meteorology major Jeremiah Grider as well as computer science major, John Kennealy.

Before the voting was opened among the SGA members, the three candidates were able to address the room for a fiveminute speech on why they should be elected as next semester’s Speaker of the Senate. Kennealy approached the podium first and discussed how the speaker should be a “developer,” as well as a “facilitator.”

“I think they should be a developer and pushing those new senators to be emerging leaders,” Kennealy said. “I think your speaker should be a facilitator, your speaker should say ‘Hey let me get you in touch with person x’ and be able to help you achieve those goals. Your speaker should be articulate, stand up and speak and not be afraid to speak their voice.”

Grider was up next to the podium as he expressed to the room that he not only wanted to be the Speaker that SGA needed, but he also wanted to bring more awareness to SGA as a whole.

“I would work with the E-Board to increase knowledge by putting on tables and programs just to get more student involvement so that we can get their involvement,” Grider said. He said he wanted the SGA “room to be filled with people.”

The voting ended in a tie between Mueller and Kennealy with 11 votes for each of them, Grider received four. There was a second voting, with one abstained, 11 votes to Kennealy and 14 votes to Mueller.

“It’s kind of amazing I have to say,” Mueller said in regards to his victory. “I didn’t really expect it and it feels awesome. I’m the first one to admit that I’m an underdog, but I don’t think it means I’m not a qualified Speaker of the Senate.”

In Mueller’s speech on why he should win, he apologized to the room ahead of time “forgive me if I shake a bit.” Mueller expressed that even though he is an underdog, that does not diminish his ability to become the Speaker of the Senate.

“I’m pretty impartial,” Mueller said. “I’d like to think I talk only when it’s necessary. During these meetings I don’t talk too much, it’s kind of ironic that you want a speaker, but you want a speaker who doesn’t talk a lot.”

Mueller said that he doesn’t want the constant “droning” that has happened in past SGA meetings and wants to keep the room focused on the issue at hand.

“I really respect your time,” Mueller said. “I respect my own time. I’m a very busy student and I’m sure all of you guys are too. I’m very personable, I can always be available in the office if I do become speaker, I also know both presidential candidates very well.”

Mueller also said that he was disappointed in this past debate that SGA just held.

“I think I can bring a lot of people to events on campus,” Mueller said. “At the debate I was kind of disappointed. Pi Kappa Phi made a big appearance and made a big showing; I’d like to see that more often. I would like to thank you guys, I really respect what SGA does. You have all inspired me to be a better leader on campus and I’m passionate about this organization. I think we can do great things together.”

In other SGA news, President Wil Gradle wanted to emphasize that SGA is “not backing” the Class Walk Out that will be happening next Tuesday, April 19 at 11:15 a.m.

“I think the symbol of it is wrong,” Gradle said. “It is hard to ask for money from the state and then not take advantage of the education you already have. ‘Give me money for my education as I walk away from my education.’ It’s not the right symbol. We’re in the position we are in because of Springfield, not those who work at Sherman Hall.”

The event’s Facebook page has a photo that says, “This act of solidarity supports laid-off and furloughed staff and faculty stemming from the Illinois budget crisis affecting public education. As students, we need to stand up and show our support for the staff and faculty at Western Illinois University.”

“I’m personally not advocating,” Gradle said. “The reason I bring it up is because it’s been shared with the impasse impact hashtag saying, ‘Hey SGA has been pushing this hashtag and pushing this movement, make sure you go and use this hashtag,’ and sort of co-opting SGA into it. So I just want to make it abundantly clear, SGA is not backing this and SGA is not organizing this. You are all free to go, as students it’s 100 percent your prerogative to go. I personally won’t be there and I will not be supporting it.”

Student Member to the Board of Trustees Michael Quigley agreed with Gradle on it being a waste to ask for something, but not appreciating what you already have.

“Please don’t walk out of class on April 19,” Quigley said. “I’m reiterating this because I find it relatively important. I don’t think the message should be that students are walking out of the education were asking the state to pay for and blaming it on people who have literally zero control over how much money we get.”

Maddie Heinzer got her GoWest Transit bill passed unanimously.  Heinzer is a political science major and the Inter-Hall Council senator.

“The students who are at the library until it closes, there is no way for them to get home,” Heinzer said. “It’s an inconvenience for me personally and I know it’s an inconvenience for other students. I feel that it should be accessible to students in organizations or to study (late).”

Heinzer said that she had talked to people at the library and that when the library closes at 2 a.m. there is an average of about 50 people around midnight, and when the library closes at 1 a.m. there is usually 22 people.

“So there are sufficient numbers for people who are there,” Heinzer said. “I personally feel like there’s a demand for this.”

Attorney General and Political Science major, Aaron Terrile reminded members that the SGA elections for the Western Board of Trustees, senators-at-large and a president and vice president are opened on STARS until 4 p.m. on Friday. For the candidates running, you can go to wiu.edu and look at the SGA Elections.


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